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FAQ
How I get to Mongolia?

Most visitors arrive in Mongolia by train or plane. The only international airport of Mongolia is located just 18 km southwest of Ulaanbaatar, the capital city.
Flights run all year round through the following aviation companies along the following routes:
National carrier MIAT Mongolia: Ulaanbaatar-Berlin Ulaanbaatar-Moscow, Ulaanbaatar-Beijing, Ulaanbaatar-Seoul-Tokyo, Ulaanbaatar-Osaka, Ulaanbaatar-Hong Kong www.miat.com
Air China: Ulaanbaatar-Beijing, Ulaanbaatar-Shanghai, Ulaanbaatar-Singapore. www.airchina.com
Korean Air: Ulaanbaatar-Seoul www.koreanair.com

Check out our Deals to Get the Cheap Flights to your favorite travel destination. http://www.onetravel.com/cheap-flights

The famous Trans-Siberian railway runs through the vast Russian territories to Beijing via Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Travel along the Trans-Siberian railway is steadily increasing in popularity.

What is the best time to travel to Mongolia?

From 1st of May to the 15th of September is best time to visit Mongolia. May is a little bit windy, but the foliage is by now turning green and animals graze peacefully with their young, a sure sign that the Mongolians have successfully passed another cold winter. June, July and August form the high season for tourism. The Mongolians celebrate their Naadam festival (the most famous traditional holiday and a renowned tourist attraction) on July 11-13th, so hotels, tourist camps, international flights and trains are all fully booked. If you wish to partake in the festivities, be sure to book your trip as early as possible. July and the beginning of August are hot, but enjoyable. In September and October you will enjoy nice sunny days and beautiful autumn colours, but it can be cool at night. In March and April, nomads welcome the newborn baby animals. The Mongolian winter are cold, but not as extreme as generally portrayed by the Western media-To see which special events take place, take a look at the "events" page on this website

Is Mongolia a safe destination to travel?

Mongolia is a very safe travel destination. In the bigger cities, particularly in Ulaanbaatar pickpockets in the crowded areas, bag snatching and robbery at night are the main dangers. Fortunately, there is no religious or political turmoil and no serious crimes against tourists have been registered. However, we do recommend that you avoid going out alone at night in Ulaanbaatar. In the countryside, most of the people are friendly, hospitable and helpful.

Is Mongolia a good place to travel with kids?

Kids should at least be 3 years old. Weather conditions, bumpy roads, standard meals (mostly meat) and sanitary facilities are not ideal for very young children.

Do I need travel insurance?

We recommend you to take travel insurance prior to your travel in case of tour cancellation, injury, illness and loss of personal possessions or money.

Can I communicate home from Mongolia?

You can call home from your HOTEL ROOM in Ulaanbaatar and use wireless at your hotel. Hotels also have business centers or internet centers at an additional fee. Prepaid international calling cards are commonly used. GSM and CDMA are both used. Internet cafes are available at 600-800 MNT per hour in Ulaanbaatar and in provincial centers. Cell phone service is widely available throughout the 21 provinces and over 330 soums (administrative unit) of these provinces. You can send post cards from post offices of provincial centers and from Ulaanbaatar, but it may take some time before they are received.

Can I use credit card?

You can use credit cards in the larger shopping centers and HOTELS IN Ulaanbaatar. In the countryside, USD and Euros can be exchanged in banks (low rate) and are accepted in some touristic service organizations. It is wise to exchange some money before leaving Ulaanbaatar.

What are the most spoken languages in Mongolia?

Most Mongolians older than 35-40 years speak in Russian as they were taught it at secondary school. Younger generations speak in English. The official language is Mongolian. Some people speak in Japanese, French, Korean and German.

Are there medical services available?

Visitors to Mongolia should be in good health condition and able to engage in a reasonable amount of physical activities. Medical services are only available in provincial centers, towns and soum (administrative unit) centers. Be sure to bring an adequate supply of any prescription medication you are on tour. Diarrhea and altitude sickness are common for travelers to Mongolia.

Should tourists tip?

It is common to tip when on tour. The amount depends on the length of your trip, the number of staff members on the trip and the number of clients on the trip. If you enjoyed your trip, giving a tip is a way of showing your gratitude. every staffs on the trip should to receive your gratitude to the staff. Tipping staff of tourist camps, restaurants and hotels is commonplace and will not go wrong.

What should I pack?

This of course depends on the type of trip your are taking, its length and the time of year. We recommend traveling as light as possible. The luggage limit on domestic flight is 15 kg, with a 2-3$ per kg surcharge depending on your destination. You can leave any items which are unnecessary for the countryside trip at the hotel. Some hotels charge for baggage storage. demand keeping charges, some not.

List of packing:
  • Necessary documents (passport, visa etc)
  • Light clothes suited to hot conditions and a raincoat/water proof jacket
  • Warm clothes and a hat in the cold season. Note that towards the end of the summer, it may be warm during the day and cold in the evenings.
  • Walking shoes
  • Small backpack
  • Better to pack in portable bag rather than hard suitcase
  • Personal medicine and some remedy against common pain
  • Torch, alarm clock, pocketknife
  • Sunglasses, sunscreen, sunhat, lip balm
  • Wet tissues, hand sanitizer
  • Biodegradable soap, mosquito spray, ear plugs, helmet (if horse riding) and a sleeping bag (depending on the type of trip)
  • Small gifts(e.g. for the children) of nomad families in exchange for their hospitality (if you will not mind). Something handy, but not expensive.